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Travis Toler

  • Why not just replace the orafices as well. This is not that hard to do and if you are using a traditional hot water heater you could do this easily enough. Additionally I want to add that what about connecting a larger say 75lb tank to the gas main instead of hacking your water heater.

    If you replace the orafices in your water heater and other…[Read more]

  • MJR, thanks for the read. Glad you enjoy this activity. I like to take my kids along and when they were younger I think they enjoyed hunting for morels more than easter eggs. This is an activity that the whole family can enjoy.

    I am of the newer mindset and that is to share your honey holes for others to enjoy as well. If others enjoy a little…[Read more]

  • Also when changing their routine or diet, I find if you spend more time with them through the transition, and provide them some extra supplement, such as some meal worms, red worms, or other treat for your girls, they will transition and adjust quicker. The occasional treat of unsalted no butter popcorn also helps them transition and pickup egg production.

  • Hey, I have found that by increasing the hens daylight hours through the winter by putting a light in their coop and set on a timer, your egg production will sustain.

  • This is a really good article. I will have to try your recipe for the cough syrup. I have this lingering cough now for several weeks, and this might be the kick it need to over this. Thanks.

  • I’ve seen the latest model of the Work Sharp system at Cabela’s last weekend, and put off buying it because the price was at $99. After researching I think I might be heading back up there to purchase. I’m one of those people, who can’t seem to find a sharpening stone when I need it. This would solve that problem as It would be staring at me from…[Read more]

  • As far as saving paper you might try cutting the paper down to maybe half a post card size, and then fasten to board with some sort of adhesive. I have quite a few knives to sharpen, and a couple axes. Do you think it would be worth the time and effort to use this for a couple axes? Thanks for the great info.

  • My girlfriend and I went on the Paleo diet last September, and are both feeling wonderful and have lost quite a significant amount of weight. I decided that I would not measure myself, not even weekly. I haven’t stepped on a scale in a couple years, and I feel better than I have in quite a few years. We fall off the wagon once in a while, but we…[Read more]

  • Michael, what type of bee would you recommend for someone with a small backyard garden/homestead say 50’x50′ yard. I live in an older neighborhood in an urban area and have a 6′ privacy fence, and have been considering getting some bees. My concerns are that I don’t really want to inadvertently myself or my neighbors to cause a swarm. How few bees…[Read more]

  • @Willy2154 That is a great idea with the “Paleo Muffins” Sounds like an omelet on-the-go. Definitely will add that to the menu. I find breakfast difficult as well and sometimes just eat a handful of grapes, raisins or trail mix. It tides me over, but not as appetizing as sitting eating steak and eggs everyday.

  • Thanks for this article, I have been on the fence with some of these topics, but see that there is benefit in becoming more self reliant and reducing my dependency from commercial growers, and big agriculture. I am not all that familiar with the permaculture community, but I can see how things get easily distorted when they tailor the principles…[Read more]

  • I enjoyed this article. Foraging is definitely a lost art. Thanks for sharing this info.

  • Travis Toler commented on the post, The Food Movement 1 year ago

    Really like the article. Is there an easy way to make/get compost tea and what is the difference between that and lechate?

  • This awesome. I love cinnamon. Another reason we need to get back to the basics.

  • Thanks, I will keep providing overall updates in the form of future articles on Brink of Freedom. If you want to see the details of each project please check out my website as I am trying to post weekly if not daily as to share my experiences.

    Again, I appreciate your interest.

  • Thanks Steve, my girlfriend and I want goats so bad, but where we live within the city limits and in an HOA controlled community makes this extremely difficult. I won’t say impossible as those types of restrictions are meant to be broken. We have decided to wait until such time as when we move to our dream property deep in to rural america, where…[Read more]

  • Ticks aren’t as prevelant here in Colorado as out east. At least this has been my experience. This area is in a fairly established residential area as most of the houses were built in the 80’s. The trees were never part of a forest as this was all open fields before this subdivision was developed.

    One concern I do have is fleas, as we have a…[Read more]

  • The Soil
    One of the first challenges a modern homesteader is faced with is poor soil. In rare instances, soil may not be your immediate issue, but you should be looking downstream to make sure this does not […]

    • Good info Travis. As a fellow Coloradoan, I relate to your comments about the soil quality here and the limited rainfall. I’m especially interested in the Hugel beds you describe and want to try them for some of my perennials like raspberries. Let me know if you ever make it up to Salida.

    • You have brought up a very important point about planning. I have seen many people start to put their plants in without any planning. I like that you have given information and incorporated different forms of watering for different situations

  • Shortly after moving in to our new home in Colorado, we began several projects that would enable us to take advantage of this property and begin making it into a homestead. We were excited to be in a more rural […]

    • Ticks aren’t as prevelant here in Colorado as out east. At least this has been my experience. This area is in a fairly established residential area as most of the houses were built in the 80’s. The trees were never part of a forest as this was all open fields before this subdivision was developed.

      One concern I do have is fleas, as we have a very healthy prairie dog population on the outskirts of the subdivision and we also have a fairly nomadic squirrel population. So my concerns are much greater than Lymes disease, but more of the Plague as these prairie dogs are more prone to transmit that to other animals.

      Though the chicks have only been outside a few days, I have not seen any ticks, but tonite I will check both rabbits and chickens and post back for those with similar concerns.

      Thanks for you comment.

    • Thanks Steve, my girlfriend and I want goats so bad, but where we live within the city limits and in an HOA controlled community makes this extremely difficult. I won’t say impossible as those types of restrictions are meant to be broken. We have decided to wait until such time as when we move to our dream property deep in to rural america, where we can have goats and sheep and a variety of roosters, as I am an avid fly fisherman and could monetize the heck out of exotic roosters for fly tying material to local fly shops.

    • Travis – This is helpful info for many people. Good luck in your works. It will all expand as you go along, so enjoy !
      I think it is very important for folks to be well versed in producing their own food from many sources and techniques. Chickens are excellent and so are goats. I will be writing about raising goats and sheep on a small scale soon. i have been spending some time doing all the research and gathering info from local people who do both on a larger scale? I have raised some in the past and the only problem was they do become very friendly? More so goats.
      Good luck in your endeavors

    • Hope it all goes well Hans. I have a backyard food source as well and will be moving out further also. Good luck in your endeavors !

    • Thanks, I will keep providing overall updates in the form of future articles on Brink of Freedom. If you want to see the details of each project please check out my website as I am trying to post weekly if not daily as to share my experiences.

      Again, I appreciate your interest.

    • This was great. I’m going to use this as a blueprint for my own efforts now that we’ve moved from the Big City.

  • One of the most difficult things to do is attempt to find something that is trying not to be found. For years naturalists and enthusiasts alike have been gathering these wild mushrooms. They typically have a short […]

    • Jack Spirko, Nicholas Ferguson and I just had a wonderful dish of morels harvested off of our first PermaEthos farm. They were delicious!

    • MJR, thanks for the read. Glad you enjoy this activity. I like to take my kids along and when they were younger I think they enjoyed hunting for morels more than easter eggs. This is an activity that the whole family can enjoy.

      I am of the newer mindset and that is to share your honey holes for others to enjoy as well. If others enjoy a little success they will be sold hook line and sinker on hunting morels in the spring. BUT, don’t give away all your secrets. A good morel hunter can walk out of the forest with a bounty of morels when others are walking aimlessly asking themselves if they are too early or too late. I feel this activity will thrive if more morel hunters partake in this activity, and collect morels using mesh bags so they end up propogating new areas on each outing.

      Want to see more pictures of morels head over to my flickr site and check out my morel set: https://www.flickr.com/photos/travisty2008/sets/72157626427564791/

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