Home » Homesteading » Brower Equipment Poultry Reel Feeder

Brower Equipment Poultry Reel Feeder

One of my largest frustrations in starting our farming enterprise has been that of figuring out what equipment works and doesn’t work.  The wrong selection ends up costing you time, mental health and most importantly money.  And trust me, I’ve made my fair share of poor choices.  Anytime you can learn from someone who “has been there and done that”, make it your business to do so!  It will save you a lot of heartache in the end, and is quite frankly the reason this website even exists.

In an attempt to save money, I have re-purposed, salvaged and built all kinds of equipment for the farm.  And yes, there are some designs out there to build poultry feeders using PVC that work pretty well.  My experience with them was that they allowed the birds to waste a lot of feed.  A lot of feed!  With that in mind, this is one area where spending some money makes a lot of sense to me.  That grain you are setting out each day costs way more money than a good functioning feeder that keeps the feed off of the ground, and where it belongs: in front of the birds so they can eat it and fatten up!  Such is the case with the Brower Equipment Reel Feeder for pastured poultry operations.  This is a piece of equipment that doesn’t really care if you are a homesteader or commercial producer, it will serve you well and is worth the cost.

These feeders are molded, heavy duty plastic and work great for chickens on pasture aged 3 weeks up to maturity.  We also double purpose them and raise our Thanksgiving turkeys with them as well.  They don’t tip, they hold an enormous amount of grain and will take a beating.  Holding enough grain is something that is often overlooked when raising fast growing meat birds.  These birds are high octane sports cars, and if you don’t have adequate fuel in front of them they can stress out and really hurt your performance in a hurry.  And, the design really keeps the feed in the feeder and not on the ground so long as you don’t overfill them.  That simply is not the case with homemade PVC feeders that I have seen.

As your birds grow, you also need lots of linear footage so that a good percentage of them can belly up to the bar at once.  The Brower feeders are 4′ or 5′ long respectively.  In our 120 square foot tractors, one feeder will suffice for the first week to ten days on pasture and a second one can be added after that through maturity.  These are well built and when I say they can take a beating, I mean it.  I have run over these with my 1/2 ton truck and had ice build up bust holes into them.  The darn things are so thick that you can literally just bolt or screw scab pieces of lumber or plastic onto them and repair them.  We have some really ugly looking Brower feeders here, but they are still doing there job and some of them are going into their 7th year of use!

So is there any downside to this equipment?  Nothing is perfect and these feeders have two negatives, one of which is easily remedied but creates an additional problem.  The one physical flaw is how the handle is attached to the feeder itself.  A single, not terribly long, really small screw is provided to thread into the PVC cap on each end of the PVC handle to attach it to uprights on the feeder.  In practice, it’s good because it allows the “reel” feeder to do it’s job.  The handle will spin freely if a chicken attempts to roost on the handle (and they will), throwing them off so they can’t poop in the feed ruining it.  However, after a season or two of use and being moved each day out in the elements, the screws become loose and fall out.  I’ve taken to putting lag bolts in the end so the handles remain in place, but then they don’t spin as freely allowing the birds to roost more than I would prefer.  In time, I’ll figure out a better solution (or so I hope) but for now this is my one frustration with the design.  It works really well initially, but the guy who designed it doesn’t have to use it everyday until that part fails.  The second issue is simply cost.  A 48″ feeder will run you $60 plus shipping and a 60″ feeder $65 plus shipping.  But in my view, they are well worth the high expense.  Easy to move, easy to fill, holds a lot of feed and will give you years upon years of solid service.

In the end, this is a great piece of equipment even with the two issues mentioned above and I highly recommend them.  To view the feeders and download a PDF brochure or instruction booklet, you can visit Brower Equipments website.  However, Brower doesn’t sell anything direct so you’ll have to order them from an authorized distributor.  Never fear, I have two resources for you to consider that I have personally used and had good success with!  My absolute favorite place in the world to buy equipment, laying hens, ducks, etc is Meyer Hatchery located in Ohio.  This is a GREAT family owned business that once ran through a wall for us to correct a problem on their end.  They carry both the 5′ long feeder and the 4′ long feeder.  Your other option is an outfit in Florida called Double R Supply, and they carry both feeders as well.  The pricing at each place is about the same, so use the one who can ship it to you less expensively.  These feeders are also easy to put together in just a few minutes with basic PVC primer and glue, and will be ready to use in no time at all after opening the box.   Good luck!

One of my largest frustrations in starting our farming enterprise has been that of figuring out what equipment works and doesn’t work.  The wrong selection ends up costing you time, mental health and most importantly money.  And trust me, I’ve made my fair share of poor choices.  Anytime you can learn from someone who “has been there and done that”, make it your business to do so!  It will save you a lot of heartache in the end, and is quite frankly the reason this website even exists. In an attempt to save money, I have re-purposed, salvaged and built…

Review Overview

Works as Advertised - 8
Reliability - 9
Ease of Use - 10
Cost - 7

8.5

Total Score

User Rating: Be the first one !

About Darby Simpson

Profile photo of Darby Simpson
Darby grew up on his family’s seventh generation farm located in Central Indiana, just 25 miles outside of Indianapolis. However he never learned anything about the family business. He began his own farming enterprise in 2007 after reading “Pastured Poultry Profits” by Joel Salatin as well as several other sources of information pertaining to small scale pasture based meat production. The operation produced 150 pastured broilers that first year that were quickly sold and generated a base of avid customers who were left clamoring for more. In 2008, the enterprise grew to 1,000 birds while pastured pork was also added, with the hogs all being spoken for thru successful marketing to the existing customer base. By 2012, the farm was producing up to 3,000 pastured broilers, 125 turkeys, 60 hogs and 12 beef per year while using less than 20 total acres. The farm now financially supports Darby and his wife Brandy, along with their two young boys, Ethan and Zach. Darby has transitioned himself from a successful mechanical engineer into a full time farmer and enjoys the many benefits that come with being self sufficient in ones livelihood. His success shows it is possible to build a business from scratch with little or no knowledge of what Joel Salatin affectionately calls “lunatic farming”.

Check Also

From the Bottom Up – A DIY Guide to Wicking Beds

Project: The Transformation of Our Urban Home Wicking beds are a unique and increasingly popular way …

Leave a Reply